Skip to main content

About your Search

20121130
20121130
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
been a centralized decision, and you've got one organization called cloud flare out of california that published this fascinating video which shows how the route to syrian upstream providers one by one were shut down all starting after noon local time on thursday, effectively plunging 20 million syrians into internet darkness. now, it's the opposition that has made very effective use of the internet thus far, actually, using the internet to upload opposition videos, to youtube, get their voices out to the outside world. so, it doesn't seem like they would have much of an incentive to plunge syria into internet darkness. and despite the fact that the state internet providers went down, the opposition activists have still been getting their images out of friday, the traditional anti-government protests, via alternative methods of communication, satellite phones, for example. that we know the u.s. and the british governments have been supplying to activists. we've seen them out in the streets calling for the downfall of the syrian regime as they've done every friday for 20 bloody dea
in california. what happens if the court decides not to hear this one? >> it is tricky, don, because first of all, nothing is simple to the supreme court. it depends what the court does. the court could formally reject that case, which means the lower court ruling stands, so for proposition 8, a federal appeals court already ruled that the ban which passed as a referendum by the way is unconstitutional. so the supreme court rejecting the case would basically make same sex marriage legal again in california. this is another big point, though, the supreme court could simply decide just to sit on the case, not hear it this term, not reject it either and that basically would put the decision off to a later date. and then at that time, california would just sort of be stuck in a legal limbo until the court makes a decision. >> all right. so we'll just basically what you're saying we'll have to wait and see what happens on this one, right? >> yeah. >> several cases deal with doma, the defense of marriage act, is what we're talking about. what is at the heart of those cases and how likely is it t
well in places like california where people drive long distances and where a lot of people are very concerned about the environment and want to drive hybrid or electric vehicles. so even though they haven't been so strong throughout the rest of the country, companies like general motors continue to push ahead with these vehicles. here is their newest introduction, which will be on the market in 2014. only available for sale in california and in oregon initially. this is the chevy spark. it is an all electric vehicle that will get somewhere south of 100 miles on a full charge. what's really cool about this vehicle is you'll be able to charge it up to 80% capacity in just 20 minutes. that is a challenge, though, getting the rest of america outside of places like california to buy these vehicles. listen to what gm had to say about that. >> the key now is to sell these vehicles in the same kind of quantity in st. louis and des moines, in the heartland of america, if you will. when you drive an electric car, we're not going to sell this thing on the environmental aspect aspects. these ca
wade into this issue, one of the cases they can hear is the appeal of california's prop 8, the ballot metro that bans same-sex marriage. what's at stake? is. >> the first word is if, and so you have to reiterate that we don't know if that decision to take up this case is going to come today or even this term. it could and it might, and there's speculation that it will, but if the supreme court has anything, it's unpredictable, and on the proposition 8 case, there's a specific question. can a state referendum abolish same-sex marriage after the courts have already ruled that it's legal? remember, that statewide vote to ban gay marriage was in response to courts in california legalizing same-sex marriage. assuming the supreme court sticks to this specific issue, it would have big implications for, say, california, but wouldn't necessarily be a sweeping ruling that would impact same-sex marriage all over the country. >> joe, talk a little bit about these cases that are challenging the federal defense of marriage act, known as doma. this is essentially the law that defines marriage betwee
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4